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Saturday, April 16, 2011

Zion National Park

Here are some photos from our recent visit to Zion National Park. It was cold, wet, and even snowy on one day, but eventually got sunny later on.

At the end of this series of photos you'll see a photo of an old bare tree that was near the top of the Angels' Landing hike. It is followed by some detail shots of portions of the trunk and roots. When I looked closer at the trees roots, I saw a rich display of color and texture that caught my eye. So easy to miss, but the beauty was there for anyone to look. The whorls on the roots were pale, but when I sacrificed most of by bottle of water to wet the roots, the colors and textures came out more clearly. Life is that way; religion is that way. There is richness and beauty in the roots, though they may seem dry, dusty, and decayed. A little sacrifice can help us appreciate how much is there and change what we can see.

(Click to enlarge the photos slightly.)











7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cool photos.

andrejules said...

Great pictures. I love Zion. Once five of us Provo teenagers hiked down the Virgin River from Cedar Breaks to Zion in August: walking in the stream most of the way, especially through the Narrows, so deep you could look up and see stars at mid-day. A trip I will always remember.

thatgoodpart said...

great photos.

Jillian said...

Great analogy! I love that area. It is so beautiful! I haven't been there in years, though. And I'm with andrejules...the Narrows are awesome!!

Anonymous said...

"so deep you could look up and see stars at mid-day"

That's a funny line. A factual impossibility, unfortunately.

Jeff Lindsay: said...

It just means that somebody's watch stopped working while they were on a very long hike in the narrows. It was probably 2 AM when the noticed the stars at midday. :) Or maybe they hiked during a solar eclipse.

Matt said...

Amazing photography. I am not a Latter-Day Saint, but I can understand how such awe-inspiring land could be viewed as sacred by the Mormon pioneers.