Discussions of Mormons and Mormon life, Book of Mormon issues and evidences, and other Latter-day Saint (LDS) topics.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

More on the Ebola Threat and the Need to Prepare for Deliberate Spread of the Disease

In a previous post on the Ebola threat, I reminded us of our need to be prepared for crisis when I raised the specter of terrorists deliberately spreading Ebola in the States. I suggested that our lax border security could make it way too easy for enemies to bring infectious materials and infected people into the nation. Of course, the laxness that threatens us involves not just the borders that people walk across illegally, but the borders people fly across with proper documentation.

To better appreciate the potential for mayhem here, I recommend Marc Thiessen's article in the Washington Post, "A ‘Dark Winter’ of Ebola terrorism?" He points out that the ease of access Islamic extremists have to Ebola-afflicted regions in Africa and the willingness of some to sacrifice their lives to create disaster for others could lead to abundant opportunities to spread infection in the West, infecting many before authorities knew an attack was underway. The result could rapidly overwhelm our ability to respond and lead to chaos in many regions. I hope these are crazy concerns, but to me, it's crazy not to be prepared for that kind of trouble in this age. It is possible.

In addition to food and water, basic supplies to maintain hygiene can be vital in times of crisis, including lots of soap, rags, towels, extra blankets, and abundant plastic bags. Be prepared.

There might be other agents that terrorists will choose to use besides Ebola, but is there any reason to think that they won't eventually turn to deliberately induced epidemics to spread their terror? I suspect our politicians will continue to do what politicians tend to do, namely politics, and are not going to take this problem seriously until it is too late. But you can act now to be ready just in case.

Plastic bags: have you stopped to imagine just how useful these can be in times of chaos? Very valuable for hygiene and other purposes. Paper towels, wipes, rags, face masks, etc. Imagine different scenarios and be prepared. These "small means" can be the difference between life and death when epidemics strike.

What supplies do you feel are most important?

Thursday, October 23, 2014

An Old Map Offers More Potential Evidence on Joseph's Views on Book of Mormon Lands

On this blog, I've previously discussed statements showing Joseph Smith's views in support of Mesoamerica as the primary location for Book of Mormon events in the New World. Thanks to Warren Aston, I just learned of another factor to consider. In the archives of the Church is a map from some early Latter-day Saints allegedly giving information obtained from Joseph Smith about the travels of Moroni from Bountiful in Book of Mormon lands to the burial place of the Book of Mormon in the Hill Cumorah of New York State. Bountiful, according to the map, was in "Sentral America" (Central America). For details, see H. Donl Peterson, "Moroni, the Last of the Nephite Prophets" in The Book of Mormon: Fourth Nephi Through Moroni, From Zion to Destruction.

The map claims that Moroni stopped in Manti, Utah on his way to New York. Well, I guess that could happen. But to me the interesting point for now is that the statements of the men involved are again consistent with the idea that Joseph Smith was open to Mesoamerica/Central America as a setting for ancient Book of Mormon events. Potentially another piece of evidence for understanding Joseph's views.

Friday, October 10, 2014

LDS Family Takes on a Giant Risk and Rescues a Troubled Young Lady

So far it looks like a real miracle underway, an amazing story of rescuing a lost soul. A young lady in a broken family who just turned 18 had been in our prayers for a long time. We were pained by the stories we heard and the tragic downward spiral in her life. We knew she was smart and had vast potential, but it was being wiped out by drugs,  horrific friends, and a lengthy list of tragic problems.

She was leaving home and about to trapped forever, it seemed, in a hopeless situation, when an LDS family with their own children and challenges did something amazing. In spite of the risk, they brought her into their home and gave her a chance to find herself again. To my amazement, it seems to be working. In a new environment away from the worst influences in her life and with loving coaching, she was able to see that she could change and regain control over her life. The rescue, to me, is a miracle. It is a touching example of what I like best about the teachings of the Church, namely, the idea that each soul is a daughter or son of God with infinite potential and the power to change, with God's help.

The Gospel expands our imagination. It helps us imagine that the drug addict with a criminal record and abundant bad behavior is worth loving and helping. It helps us dare believe that change is possible. It helps us take on risk to reach out to others when we might normally want to just lock up our doors and stay away. It helps us defy the world's logic that "everybody is doing it" or "a little sin is perfectly OK" and strive to live better each day. But the results of such expanded imagination are far from imaginary. While disappointment is common in dealing with mortals, sometimes, as with this young lady, the results are miraculous.

Thanks to all of you who dare to love and serve those in trouble in spite of the logical temptation to stay away. Thanks to all of you who love, pray for, and reach out to those who seem lost. They can be rescued, and whether they respond or not to your efforts, they are infinitely worth rescuing and loving.

Thanks especially to a brave LDS family who reached out to a lost young lady and brought her back. I chatted with her recently and then the LDS father and was simply delighted to hear details of the story. More wonderful than I imagined was possible.

Saturday, October 04, 2014

A New International Accent in General Conference

Over here in Asia, some of us are thrilled that a General Authority could deliver his talk in Cantonese (see the news story at the Salt Lake Tribune). Elder Chi Hong (Sam) Wong made history as he gave the first General Conference sermon in a language other than English. We had the pleasure of meeting him a while ago in Shanghai--very kind and interesting man. Later Elder Eduardo Gavarret gave his talk in Spanish. Awesome!

I look forward to hearing some talks in Mandarin in the future.

English will continue to dominate the leadership of the Church, but it may become a minority language among Mormon leaders in the future.

Which reminds me, this would be a good time for more of you to start studying Mandarin. Great for your own personal enrichment, great for business, and great for communicating with so much of the world. Just a suggestion, one that President Kimball himself made a few decades ago.

Friday, October 03, 2014

A Quiet Path Leads Us to the City of the Dead in Kyoto, Japan

As I write, I am in the beautiful city of Kyoto, Japan. Yesterday we and thousands of others tourists visited the popular site of Kiyomizu-Dera, where an beautiful ancient temple sits on a lofty hill overlooking Kyoto. As we departed the crowded site, we noticed a quiet little detour from the exit path leading to some iron gates. Curious, we continued and entered into what I felt was the most spectacular view of all in this area: the Kiyomizu-Dera Graveyard, where thousands upon thousands of cremation remains are marked with tombstones that stand like little skyscrapers over a vast city of the dead. To me, it looked like a miniature scale version of Shanghai with its endless towers.

What a beautiful scene and moving place to ponder the lives of those who have gone before us. What an inspiring place to contemplate life and history, especially the rich and often painful history of Japan. How strange that we were the only ones there! Busload after busload of people were coming and going, passing within a few dozen meters from this place, seemingly unaware that it was here. After a few moments, an elderly English couple came by who apparently had seen us wander through the gates and came to see what we had found. Good for them!

I have often felt that the most interesting and valuable portions of our explorations in many popular venues were the little detours that took us to places the masses overlooked. The "road less traveled" is filled with treasures. I feel the Gospel of Jesus Christ is that way. Overlooked or shunned by many, hardly a popular destination, but waiting there in quiet paths for seekers looking for beauty and inspiration. The perspective of the Gospel is one that helps us to look upon scenes like Kyoto's City of the Dead with wonder, respect, and hope, knowing that their stories matter and that those souls yet live, waiting for the joy of the Resurrection when they will be part of the great Heavenly City that awaits us.