Discussions of Mormons and Mormon life, Book of Mormon issues and evidences, and other Latter-day Saint (LDS) topics.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Coach Lindsay's Power Secret for Success in Tennis and in Life!

Roger Federer, courtesy of Wikipedia.
Tonight I'll confess to having watched some television (while diligently working on a crucial project, of course--hardly noticed the TV for at least some of the time). The Wimbledon semifinals tennis match between two charming tennis players, Roger Federer and Kevin Anderson, has been outstanding. I am a long-time Federer fan (from Switzerland, my beloved mission country!), but it's hard not to also cheer for Anderson, a fellow excessively tall person (oops, that's a microagression: I mean "altitudinally different"). Both are great athletes and great sports.

Like many people, I have a great deal of unearned self-confidence and consider myself to be a good tennis player, good enough to beat either of these men on any given day. Here I define "given day" to mean "day when my opponent is severely injured or in prison." But I'm an even better tennis coach. Through years of careful analysis of tennis, I have developed some sure-fire secrets of tennis success that I am sure would do much to improve the play even of these champions.

I'm revealing these secrets at no cost as a gift to my readers. First I'll review some basic  secrets, and then comes the real power secret.

Basic secrets you may already know:

#1: When receiving a serve, stand where the ball is going to come. Aces tend to do where you are not. You should have been over there, waiting for it. Come on!

#2. Hit the ball over the net and inside the lines. So simple, but so many points are lost by not following this overlooked secret.

#3. When serving, hit the ball to where your opponent isn't standing or likely to reach. Amazing how often this basic secret is overlooked. 

But these secrets are for winning individual points. The power secret that you are about to learn is not about running around all day trying to win a point here or a point there. It's about focusing on the one thing that really matters: not losing the match.

Here's the critical insight: in the end, winning a match comes down to the final point, the match point. If you never lose a match point, you will never lose a match. That's the key! That's the secret! Secret, you ask? Yes! In fact, it's obvious that even Federer himself doesn't fully understand this secret and it's proper application, which you are about to learn.

In this match I'm watching tonight, like almost all matches I've seen, players wear themselves out running back and forth across the court to hit the ball in order to win individual points. Points that don't really matter in the end because they are not the match point! Remember, the winner of the match is the one who wins what? That's right: the match point! Now here is the practical guidance you need for success, Coach Lindsay's Secret Power Tip:

When playing tennis, always check: Is this the match point? If not, let it go. Relax. Save your energy. Don't chase the ball like crazy for a point that doesn't matter. Save all your energy for the one point that does matter: the match point, and just make sure you win it. As long as you win the match point, you will never lose. It's that simple!

Don't sweat the small stuff, don't worry about anything except what really matters: avoiding the ultimate disaster when it's immediately before you. Until then, let it go and enjoy!

Coach Lindsay's Power Secret has not yet affected competitive tennis (understandable--it was unknown to the world until today), but the same principle seems to be at work in many other parts of the economy in the US and other nations:
  • Do we have hyperinflation? Are hungry mobs rampaging in the streets? No? No worry, let's print more money to stimulate the economy. 
  • Have they turned off my utilities or shut off my phone service? No? Then relax and use that credit card to spend a little more money that I don't have. 
  • Am I starving? No? This might be a good time to take a break year before looking for a job. 
  • Are the checks we issue to teachers, firemen, and other government employees bouncing, and are angry mobs of unpaid workers burning down our government office buildings demanding their pension money? No? Let's increase our debt even more to keep our state or city government functioning. (No, I'm not singling out Illinois or New Jersey here.)
  • Have all the people with the capital and sills needed to create jobs left our state already? No? Then let's crank up taxes on them even more. 
  • Has the economy ground to a halt? No? Oh, yes? Um, fix the stats to say it's healthy, and then let's divert more of our nation's capital on unnecessary war in nations that aren't attacking us.
  • Have I lost my job? No? Then no need to develop new skills. Good time to turn on the TV or open up YouTube and watch something fun. Maybe even a little tennis. (Oops!)
So you can play tennis and economics and life the old school way, working hard and being wise and frugal and nervous about the future every step of the way, or you can relax and stay focused on what matters: avoiding disaster by not worrying about it until you really, really need to worry, which is usually a distant tomorrow, right?

You know Coach Lindsay's Power Secret now. Enjoy!

Friday, July 06, 2018

Misdiagnosis!

A few days ago a grieving mom in Shanghai, a good friend of ours, shared some tragic news with me: her teenage son had pancreatic cancer, one of the worst cancers. Her son was likely to die soon, if the doctor was correct. Only about 20% of pancreatic cancer patients live past 5 years. She was almost overcome with grief and had been crying for a couple of days. But even though she had gone to an expensive hospital that caters to foreign clients, she wasn't sure she should trust the doctor. The mother called me to see if I knew where she could turn for help. She didn't know that one of my sons happens to be a doctor treating cancer as a radiation oncologist at a leading US clinic.

I received a photo of the lab report for the boy and sent it to my son. The report mentioned a scan of internal organs showing no unusual problems indicative of cancer. There were no other symptoms, just a slightly elevated CA-19-9 antigen level, with a value of 45 instead of a desired maximum of 37.

My son explained that the CA-19-9 test is not supposed to be used for diagnosing cancer on its own. Absent other symptoms of cancer, its predictive power for cancer is less than 1%, he said. When he learned that the son was just a teenager, he said it's even less likely to be pancreatic cancer because that disease is almost unheard of in young people. The mother's grief was turned to relief.

I later found scientific publications confirming what my son had said. For example, see K. Umashankar et al., "The clinical utility of serum CA 19-9 in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: An evidence based appraisal," Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology, 2012 Jun; 3(2): 105–119; doi: 10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2011.021:
CA 19-9 serum levels have a sensitivity and specificity of 79-81% and 82-90% respectively for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in symptomatic patients; but are not useful as a screening marker because of low positive predictive value (0.5-0.9%).
Other articles indicate that diabetics, such as this young man, can have inflated CA-19-9 values (this applies at least for Type 2 diabetes--I'm not sure if CA-19-9 artifacts from Type 1 diabetes has been investigated), one of many possible alternative causes of elevated CA-19-9 values. Alternative causes for the elevated test result do not appear to have been  considered by the doctor who terrified a mom by declaring that it was probably pancreatic cancer. Again, the test can be useful in tracking the progress of treatment of a known cancer, but should not be used to diagnose cancer in the absence of other evidence, as in this case.

The family still needs to be cautious and follow up on the possible causes of the inflated test result, but it was only slightly elevated unlike the much higher scores that I've seen reported in patients who actually do have pancreatic cancer.

To be fair, the doctor may have just said pancreatic cancer was one of several possibilities and he did ask the mom to go get further tests, but whatever he actually said or meant to say, what she understood was that her son probably had a usually lethal cancer. He also told her not to discuss it with her son or husband until they had done further tests, which may mean that he didn't want the family to be all panicked for nothing, but the effect of that requirement was that the mother was all panicked and all alone, unable to discuss her grief with others.

In deep grief, the mother had been fasting and praying, unconsoled. After fasting, she felt she should turn to someone to get another opinion, but didn't know where to go. She feels it was inspiration that she reached out to me, not knowing that my son would be able to help.

I am so grateful that my son was able to help bring peace to a mother who had been crying for a couple of days over the "fake news" she received from a generally good hospital. I suggest that here or anywhere else you should be open to the possibility that some doctors don't know what they are talking about. And of course, that can apply to what I've said here. Do your homework, ask questions, and be cautious about what others declare.

I raise this story as an example of how much pain a misdiagnose can cause. This was a minor case compared to misdiagnoses that lead to unnecessary surgery, improper amputation, blindness, or death. It reminds us that even experts can and often do make serious mistakes.

Misdiagnosis is a problem not just for physical health but also for our spiritual health. There are many who have been turned to unnecessary fear and even panic about Mormons and the LDS faith because of a local expert, often a pastor or religious friend, who declares that Mormonism is a cancer and that Mormons aren't even Christian or don't believe in the Jesus of the Bible. This kind of misdiagnosis is more outrageous than treating a mildly elevated CA-19-9 test as evidence of pancreatic cancer in a young person. The hear, anger, and confusion that has been caused by this persistent misdiagnosis truly is malignant.

There are LDS people who panic and abandon what was once a strong testimony over an expert somewhere who proclaims that Mormonism is a cancer or proven to be wrong. Sometimes the diagnosis is based on a rigged or improperly executed test, and other times there is a metric of some kind that points to a genuine problem, but a problem that should not be lethal to a testimony. Such problems can be due to the confusion and errors that always happen when mortals are allowed to do anything in the Church, no matter how much we want them to be infallible. More often than not, I think the real problem are inaccurate assumptions on our part about how God should do things or about what may or may not occur in a Church led by prophets and apostles of God. Such problems are often linked to inadequate information on our part, requiring a recognition of our incomplete knowledge and the patience and faith to wait for more.

We see through a glass darkly in this life. Faith and patience will always be required (Luke 22:19). There will always be doubts that can be stirred up, but if we have found the pearly of great price through faith, study, patient following of God's counsel and the witness of the Holy Ghost, we should be prepared to deal with the inevitable onslaught of experts and other sources of doubt with a healthy dose of doubt itself, that is, to "doubt our doubts" -- a phrase that to me means to have a healthy dose of skepticism about the attacks made by various experts, and to have an even healthier dose of faith and patience as we seek guidance and help to cope with those doubts. Reaching out to others who may have experience and knowledge with the issue can be helpful. Fasting and seeking inspiration from the Lord may be essential.